Bogus Gambler

Businessman used fake bank documents to pretend he had £20m so he could gamble huge sums in exclusive London casinos

By Corey Charlton for MailOnline
19:34 18 Aug 2014, updated 19:48 18 Aug 2014
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Shy Dahan said to have used bogus documents to gamble as a high roller
He allegedly used fake Credit Suisse paperwork to show exaggerated wealth
Then spent hundreds of thousands of pounds at top class West End casinos
Dahan, of Mayfair, is on trial for four counts of fraud by false representation
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Shy Dahan, who had a taste for gambling in London’s exclusive clubs and casinos
A businessman masqueraded as a real estate tycoon responsible for ‘skyscrapers and swarming estates’ in order to gamble huge sums of cash in exclusive casinos, a court heard today.

Shy Dahan, 33, allegedly used bogus Credit Suisse paperwork to mislead casino staff about his wealth.

He produced documents from the Gibraltar arm of the bank showing he had more than £20m in his account in a bid to gain credit at some of London’s flashest clubs and casinos.

Southwark Crown Court heard he posed as a successful real estate guru to Credit Suisse, boasting of properties in New York, Toronto, Mexico, and Israel.

Claiming to be the owner of S Capital Group, Dahan’s website claimed he was someone who ‘fulfills his dreams, turning visions into skyscrapers and swarming estates’.

But jurors heard the blurb about Dahan and his company, alongside details of its ongoing projects, was directly lifted from a genuine real estate firm’s website called Canada-Israel.

‘Every single last word of it is a complete lie, a complete gigantic lie,’ said prosecutor Simon Wild said.

‘Mr Dahan is a businessman, but what businessman he exactly was is partly what this case is all about.

‘The prosecution allege that the defendant pretended to be a far more substantial businessman than in truth he was.’

Credit Suisse produced a letter for Dahan stating he had liquid assets of over £20m, after he duped them into believing he was the owner of the successful S Capital Group.

Dahan then allegedly used the statement to target London Clubs International and its ‘Vegas-style’ super casinos across the West End, which includes the Playboy Club in Piccadilly and The Casino At The Empire in Leicester Square.

The court heard that on November 27, 2012, Dahan visited a London Club casino and produced the Credit Suisse letter, claiming that he had more than £1m in his bank account.

Just nine days later on December 6, the Israeli provided the same statement to the Clermont Club in Berkeley Square in London’s lavish Mayfair district, claiming he had over £20m in liquid assets.

Jurors heard after he was caught out by the Clermont Club, Dahan then made false statements to the Gambling Commission the following day.

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He sent a fake letter to the Gambling Commission on December 7, 2012, which he hoped would aid an associate to open a casino in a London Hilton hotel, the court heard.

He allegedly claimed that he had more than £20m in liquid assets and that the assets were ‘realisable within 24 hours’.

The court also heard Dahan blew £230,000 playing the tables at the Playboy Club after he falsely claimed to have £1m sitting in his account.

Mr Wild said that Dahan had supplied a forged Credit Suisse letter to bosses at the casino so that he could pay his losses via cheque.

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The Casino At The Empire was one of several venues owned by London Clubs International targeted by Dahan
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Dahan allegedly gave The Playboy Club, pictured, a letter falsely claiming he had £1m in his bank account
‘The defendant also wanted to pay by cheque for his gambling,’ Mr Wild added. ‘He had to satisfy the club that he did indeed have a bank account from which he could pay cheques he could honour’.

Jurors were told that Dahan supplied a Credit Suisse letter to the Playboy Club on November 27, 2012, claiming he had a ‘long standing relationship with the bank’, even though his account was only opened three months before.

The letter also stated Dahan had a bank balance of over £1m, when in reality the figure was $439,409.78 – less than £300,000.

‘So that letter was very simply a lie’, Mr Wild said. ‘ A pretty substantial lie as the Playboy Club was left £230,000 out of pocket’.

Mr Wild said: ‘When the defendant was arrested and interviewed in June 2013 he was asked how substantial a businessman he was.

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He also visited The Clermont Club, a private gambling venue in Berkeley Square
‘He said that he had a company in Mexico called ID Exchange and that this company had several retail outlets’.

Dahan claimed to sell ‘Dead Sea products’, handcuffs called ‘cuffs of love’, spinners and hair straighteners.

He also told an officer he ran a bungee jumping operation, Mr Wild added.

Dahan, of Mayfair, central London, and formerly of Tel-Aviv in Israel, denies four counts of fraud by false representation.

The trial continues.

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One thought on “Bogus Gambler”

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